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🛎️AT Daily! is Sal’s live show (Facebook and YouTube at Accidental Talmudist) based on the Daf Yomi cycle of Talmud study. The cycle began on January 5, 2020 and with God’s help, Sal will elucidate every page of the Talmud (2,711pp) over the next seven and a half years!

Sal generally goes live on Facebook and YouTube at 6pm Sunday-Thursday, 12pm Friday and about an hour after Shabbat ends every Saturday. For Jewish holidays, same schedule as Shabbat. All times Pacific.

The Talmud is a vast reservoir of Jewish wisdom based on the oral tradition which stretches back to the Revelation at Mount Sinai, when God appeared to two million Jews and transmitted the Ten Commandments, the Written Torah and the Oral Torah.

  • Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 1, 2, 3 What can we deduce from certain unclear grave markings? Why did the Sages send agents into the farm fields to inspect and uproot prohibited mixtures of “diverse kinds?” Why did they stop …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 1 On the intermediate days of a Festival one may attend to the needs of the public even if it requires strenuous effort, but what qualifies as a need of the public? Marking graves so …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 1 What is the excessive exertion that prohibits certain kinds of work from being done on the intermediate days of a festival? What does this mean in practical terms today? Can we derive 6th year …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 1 How do we derive from the Torah what kinds of labor are prohibited during the seventh year of the Sabbatical cycle of the land? How is this related to the kinds of work permitted …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 1 What kind, and how much, work may be done during the intermediate days of a Festival (Passover or Sukkot)? Depends on the consequences of not doing the task and how strenuous it will be. …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 6 Torah readings for festivals. The might and humility of God are inextricably connected. How to handle, roll, and read from a Torah scroll. Why we chant when we study Torah and Talmud. #Judaism #halacha …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 5, 6 The Sages establish the order of the four special Torah readings in the weeks leading up to Passover, and how the schedule is adjusted for Purim and Rosh Chodesh that may also land …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 4, 5 Torah study is the highest, and we prioritize it over everything else, but we interrupt it to attend a funeral or wedding. What is the Divine Presence, and where/when does it accompany the …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 3, 4 A series of spectacular teachings about the virtuous behavior of certain long-lived Sages. No shortcuts through a prayer space, and other rules pertaining to synagogues and study halls. #Judaism #halacha #Torah #Megillah #Purim …

Key Dafs

  • Topics covered: Chapter 3, Mishna 4 The fine linen garments of the High Priest on Yom Kippur were fine indeed! Apropos the wealth of one High Priest who was also a Sage, Rabbi Elazar ben Harsum, we learn that one …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 6 People crowded on the Temple Mount for Festivals, yet they all had room to bow and confess privately. This leads to an AMAZING discussion of the ongoing miracles in the Holy Temple, especially the …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 6, Mishna 1 What was the Ark of the Covenant? What was in it besides the Tablets of the Ten Commandments? Was the original Torah Scroll inside it too? Was there a second Ark that was carried …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 5 What is tumah, ritual impurity? How does to relate to tahara, ritual purity, and kedusha, holiness? How is tumah a acquired? How is it transmitted? What are its degrees? What are the consequences of …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 6, Mishna 1 The first commandment is “Be fruitful and multiply.” If it only meant “Reproduce,” then “be fruitful” would be redundant. Be fruitful is the secret to life: bearing fruit is what we souls were …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 3, Mishna 6, 7 KEY DAF! Putting our page in context. What have learned so far in our Talmud journey? Why does the concept of eruv matter? Because we transform space by creating an edifice in …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 1, Mishna 2 Beis Shammai and Beis Hillel disagree on how to correct an alleyway so carrying is permitted there on Shabbos. A certain student gives his own interpretation of the dispute. Who is this student? …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 24, Mishna 3, 4 “Shatit” dip may be mixed on Shabbos, but its method of prep should be altered. Related teachings brought down from the notebooks of Zeiri and Levi, who learned before Rabbi Chiyya and …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 23, Mishna 6, Chapter 24, Mishna 1 R’ Abbahu says the souls of the righteous shuttle back and forth between this world and the World of Souls for a year after death. Rav says that if …

  • Load More Key Dafs

The Talmud’s core is the Mishnah, written around 200 CE during a Roman persecution so intense that our sage Rabbi Yehuda the Prince feared the Oral Torah would be lost if not set down. The Mishnah is terse and coded, and thus requires interpretation and elucidation in order to be understood. The next layer of commentary was the Gemara, added around 500 CE in the Jewish community of Babylonia, where the centers of learning moved to escape Roman persecution. The Mishnah plus the Gemara equals the Talmud, but the oral tradition never stopped moving forward, with commentaries added in ever century since.

Now Salvador Litvak will attempt to add his own commentary via 40-60 minute live show every day for seven and half years. Sal generally goes live on Facebook and YouTube at 6pm Sunday-Thursday, 12pm Friday and about an hour after Shabbat ends every Saturday. For Jewish holidays, same schedule as Shabbat. All times Pacific.

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