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🛎️AT Daily! is Sal’s live show (Facebook and YouTube at Accidental Talmudist) based on the Daf Yomi cycle of Talmud study. The cycle began on January 5, 2020 and with God’s help, Sal will elucidate every page of the Talmud (2,711pp) over the next seven and a half years!

Sal generally goes live on Facebook and YouTube at 6pm Sunday-Thursday, 12pm Friday and about an hour after Shabbat ends every Saturday. For Jewish holidays, same schedule as Shabbat. All times Pacific.

The Talmud is a vast reservoir of Jewish wisdom based on the oral tradition which stretches back to the Revelation at Mount Sinai, when God appeared to two million Jews and transmitted the Ten Commandments, the Written Torah and the Oral Torah.

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 5, Mishna 5 Remembering our dear friend Schwartzie on his 4th yahrtzeit and telling over the rollicking tale of five chassidic rabbis trying to get on the stage at Woodstock II. If there had to be …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 5, Mishna 5 Our mishna paints a vivid picture of the Paschal lambs being slaughtered and prepared for Passover at the time the Holy Temple was standing in Jerusalem. Incidental to the discussion of how many people …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 5, Mishna 3, 4 A lesson on Bo vs. Lech, Come vs. Go – what does to mean that God tells Moses “Come to Pharaoh?” The laws from Torah Portion Bo inform everything we’re studying here …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 7, 8, Chapter 5, Mishna 1, 2, 3 Highlights from the week of pages while Sal was away. Additional customs relating to work on Passover eve. How to say the Shema properly, including pauses and …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 4, 5, 6 Do we refrain from performing work on the Ninth of Av, when we fast and mourn the destruction of the First and Second Temples? Local customs vary. Torah Scholars must refrain from …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 3 Apropos a discussion of local customs with respect to lighting a havdala candle (which separates holy time from mundane) after Yom Kippur, the Sages embark on a fascinating discussion regarding the origin, purpose and …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 1, 2 We remove produce from our possession when it is no longer available in the fields during the seventh – Sabbatical – year in the shmitah cycle, but the availability varies from one …

  •   Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 1 Continuing our discussion of following the custom in a locality with respect to certain stringencies of Jewish law. Does one from Israel observe the second day of a Festival when visiting outside of …

  • Topics covered: Chapter 4, Mishna 1 When we travel from one place to another, and they have different customs with respect to Jewish law, do we do like them? If they are taking on unnecessary stringencies, do we tell them? …

Key Dafs

  •   Topics covered: To be liable for carrying or throwing on Shabbos, one must first make a valid taking and finish with a valid placing of the object. If one draws water from water, or pours water into water, one …

  •   Topics covered: Why can we make up a missed Amidah but not a Shema? Rabba’s insight could uproot mountains, Rav Yosef’s knowledge encompassed the entire tradition since Sinai. Which takes precedence? Torah scholars increase peace in the world 🌎 …

  •   Topics covered: Three matters lengthen our years, three shorten, three things come only through great blessing: a good king, a good year, a good dream. A dream not interpreted is like a letter not read. Which dreams are fulfilled? …

  • Load More Key Dafs

The Talmud’s core is the Mishnah, written around 200 CE during a Roman persecution so intense that our sage Rabbi Yehuda the Prince feared the Oral Torah would be lost if not set down. The Mishnah is terse and coded, and thus requires interpretation and elucidation in order to be understood. The next layer of commentary was the Gemara, added around 500 CE in the Jewish community of Babylonia, where the centers of learning moved to escape Roman persecution. The Mishnah plus the Gemara equals the Talmud, but the oral tradition never stopped moving forward, with commentaries added in ever century since.

Now Salvador Litvak will attempt to add his own commentary via 40-60 minute live show every day for seven and half years. Sal generally goes live on Facebook and YouTube at 6pm Sunday-Thursday, 12pm Friday and about an hour after Shabbat ends every Saturday. For Jewish holidays, same schedule as Shabbat. All times Pacific.

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